Felipe Diaz

Interview with Felipe Diaz, RT Game Audio

Krotos have partnered with the team at RT Game Audio to supply them with our Sound Design Bundle 2 for the recently launched Game Audio Grant initiative. This grant will award an indie game developer with full game audio for their project by the fantastic team at RT Game Audio.

We spoke to Felipe Diaz, Audio Director for an interview to find out more about their work, the grant, how they use Krotos software in projects, and advice for those starting out in game-audio.

Hi Felipe, thanks for taking the time to talk to us today. Is it a busy time for you at the moment? What have you been working on this week?

It has been a fun week at work here at RT Game Audio. At the moment we’re working on a brawler game from a developer that is based in Europe. It has been great since a diverse set of characters are being introduced into the game, and we get to give each and every one of them its distinct sonic tone, and that’s always fun to work on.

Tell us more about RT Game Audio, how did the studio get started, and what is it you and your team do?

RT Game Audio started back in 2018 in Bogota, Colombia. After the first year, we expanded our operations to Montreal, Canada as well. Most of the associates were working full-time jobs in the audio post-production world, however, we were all avid gamers and really wanted to translate our creative efforts into the videogame industry. We started outsourcing sound assets to other companies, and proceeded to promote fully remote workflows (even before pandemic times) with independent developers.

We work on the entire soundtrack of a videogame, this includes music, sound design, implementation, localization, and whatever else you can think of inside the full sonic spectrum of a project. We also continue to work on a linear approach with cinematics and game trailers, as well as the occasional post-production gig.

What projects have you been working on at RT Game Audio recently?

We’re currently working with a Dutch developer called Rekall Games, in a crossover brawler title that features gods and legends from diverse cultures. We get to design a lot of fun sounds for very well-known characters. It’s an ongoing collaborative effort that brings us and the developers a lot of joy and fulfilment.

We have also finished up a VR project that aims to increase awareness and sustainability of representative natural environments in Colombia. Here we had the opportunity to immerse the player in different exotic ecosystems while recreating endangered animal vocal performances. We were lucky enough to have had an actual biologist as a consultant for the sound department (not exclusively) on the project.

That sounds really interesting! What aspects of working in game-audio do you find most rewarding?

For us, working in game-audio is both a challenging and gratifying experience. We like the fact that we can establish diverse workflows depending on the type of game that we are working on, allowing us to create different audio and music systems for each project. This initial approach considerably influences our sound design and audio assets production. It also allows us to review and enhance certain sonic iterations while we play the game itself, this way we get to experience how the game evolves, both as creative sources and gamers. 

It is a very rewarding experience working in this industry. We find that the additional challenges dictated by these types of workflows are the perfect combination between technical and creative approaches to sound design as a whole.   

You’ve just set up the fantastic RT Game Audio Grant, which aims to award an indie game developer with the full audio for their game. What inspired you to set this grant up?

Over the years, we have encountered numerous independent developers with great ideas but without enough resources to make them a reality. The few of them that actually manage to get a hold of some sort of funding don’t necessarily have enough to cover the hiring of a sound designer or game audio company, especially in early stages of development. We want to match these great ideas with an amazing soundtrack. There are some crazy indie games out there that could certainly benefit from world-class audio.

Our objective is to help the independent scene to grow sonically and to promote the importance of establishing early relationships and workflows with the Audio and Music departments. Our end game here is to have more AAA audio quality soundtracks within the Independent community, and to hopefully assist in the transformation of a great developing start-up into a breakthrough studio.

RT-Game-Audio-Interview-03

When tools like these allow you to achieve your goal quick enough, you have extra time to perfect the audio assets and make them unique. It boosts our creativity, allowing us to improve the sound design quality overall.  


What are the criteria for applying for the grant, and what will go into the process of choosing the winner?

There are a few things that participants will have to consider before applying. First off, we value the existing relationships that some developers may already have with sound designers and composers, in fact, that is exactly what we are trying to encourage here. With that said, applicants who already have a dedicated person/team working on the audio or music components of the game, won’t be taken into consideration. There are a few additional conditions in order to qualify for this grant. You can find the entire application criteria list on our website

The grant recipient will be selected based on the project’s originality, how engaging and entertaining the game is, and how much would it benefit from a great soundtrack. We are very fortunate to count with the support of amazing partners for this initiative, and so we will also award this grant to a game that will take advantage of our sponsors resources as well.  

You’ll be using the Krotos Sound Design Bundle 2 to work on the project for the grant. How do your Krotos plugins integrate with your workflow?

We were first acquainted with Krotos products while working on a project that had a very small delivery window. We were impressed by their capability to effortlessly produce next-level assets with multiple iterations in very little time, given that many different components of digital signal processing were consolidated within single plugins. Their capability to incorporate real-time performances also facilitates a fast-paced workflow. After this experience, we knew that these products would become essential instruments in our sound design arsenal.

When tools like these allow you to achieve your goal quick enough, you have extra time to perfect the audio assets and make them unique. It boosts our creativity, allowing us to improve the sound design quality overall.  


What I’m attempting to convey here, is to think outside of the box while designing sounds. Utilizing tools in unconventional ways will often generate “happy accidents” that will transcend into additional instruments, which consequently will elevate the sound design capabilities.  


Is there a plugin and/or sound effects library from the bundle you find the most useful for your work? Do you have any of your own tricks or techniques you could share with us?

It all depends on the project that we are working on. The Dehumaniser 2 plugin has helped us to not only produce great creature performances, but also to build our own library of eerie and spooky ambiences, thanks to the versatility provided by its node-based system. The Weaponiser plugin shares the same versatile approach to sound design as well, while encouraging the user to not only apply it to generate great weapon effects, but also to be used as a Foley performer, among other things, thanks to its very user-friendly presets.

What I’m attempting to convey here, is to think outside of the box while designing sounds. Utilizing tools in unconventional ways will often generate “happy accidents” that will transcend into additional instruments, which consequently will elevate the sound design capabilities.   

And finally, do you have any advice to pass on to those interested in starting out in game-audio?         

Yes, start working on games as soon as you can. There are a lot of resources online that facilitate learning game-audio while working on small video games. This will consequently get you acquainted with game engines and audio middleware.

It is also worth mentioning that participating in Game Jams is a great way to start gaining experience, while building up your network and generating relationships with game developers. Learn at least one programing language, and last, but certainly not least, get comfortable working with spread sheets! Do not forget that organization is a key component of Game-Audio. 

What is the RTGA Game Audio Grant?

It is a grant awarded by RT Game Audio, aimed to benefit an indie developer, small group of developers, or small Development Studio with full game audio development for one video game currently under development. RT Game Audio will create all sound assets, compose and produce all music and implement all of it at no cost for the beneficiary of the grant using our own resources and resources made available for the purpose of this grant by Krotos, Sound Particles and Pro Sound Effect.

Visit the RT Game Audio Grant

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